SOMOS COMMNITYCARE WORKFORCE AND CCHL ADVISORY COMMITTEE

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So Excited to be a part of SOMOS COMMNITYCARE WORKFORCE AND CCHL ADVISORY COMMITTEE . 

SOMOS COMMUNITY CARE   is a network of nearly 2,500 providers in the Bronx, Queens, Manhattan and Brooklyn who have come together to ensure better health care for Medicaid members.

Social Determinants of Health

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Leaving technology and software/hardware industry for a healthcare 8 years ago really opened my eyes to how healthcare works and the industry overall. There have been great initiatives over the years where healthcare focus is more on prevention and management Vs over-prescribing and over-medication ,as well as understanding what drives the ever increasing cost of the healthcare. This is great initiative showing promise to improve health as well as access to health care to those who were unable to do so int he past.

Goal

Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all.

Overview

Health starts in our homes, schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and communities. We know that taking care of ourselves by eating well and staying active, not smoking, getting the recommended immunizations and screening tests, and seeing a doctor when we are sick all influence our health. Our health is also determined in part by access to social and economic opportunities; the resources and supports available in our homes, neighborhoods, and communities; the quality of our schooling; the safety of our workplaces; the cleanliness of our water, food, and air; and the nature of our social interactions and relationships. The conditions in which we live explain in part why some Americans are healthier than others and why Americans more generally are not as healthy as they could be.

Healthy People 2020 highlights the importance of addressing the social determinants of health by including “Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all” as one of the four overarching goals for the decade. This emphasis is shared by the World Health Organization, whose Commission on Social Determinants of Health in 2008 published the report, Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health. The emphasis is also shared by other U.S. health initiatives such as the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities  and the National Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy.

The Social Determinants of Health topic area within Healthy People 2020 is designed to identify ways to create social and physical environments that promote good health for all. All Americans deserve an equal opportunity to make the choices that lead to good health. But to ensure that all Americans have that opportunity, advances are needed not only in health care but also in fields such as education, childcare, housing, business, law, media, community planning, transportation, and agriculture. Making these advances involves working together to:

  • Explore how programs, practices, and policies in these areas affect the health of individuals, families, and communities.
  • Establish common goals, complementary roles, and ongoing constructive relationships between the health sector and these areas.
  • Maximize opportunities for collaboration among Federal-, state-, and local-level partners related to social determinants of health.

Understanding Social Determinants of Health

Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Conditions (e.g., social, economic, and physical) in these various environments and settings (e.g., school, church, workplace, and neighborhood) have been referred to as “place.” In addition to the more material attributes of “place,” the patterns of social engagement and sense of security and well-being are also affected by where people live. Resources that enhance quality of life can have a significant influence on population health outcomes. Examples of these resources include safe and affordable housing, access to education, public safety, availability of healthy foods, local emergency/health services, and environments free of life-threatening toxins.

Understanding the relationship between how population groups experience “place” and the impact of “place” on health is fundamental to the social determinants of health—including both social and physical determinants.

Examples of social determinants include:

  • Availability of resources to meet daily needs (e.g., safe housing and local food markets)
  • Access to educational, economic, and job opportunities
  • Access to health care services
  • Quality of education and job training
  • Availability of community-based resources in support of community living and opportunities for recreational and leisure-time activities
  • Transportation options
  • Public safety
  • Social support
  • Social norms and attitudes (e.g., discrimination, racism, and distrust of government)
  • Exposure to crime, violence, and social disorder (e.g., presence of trash and lack of cooperation in a community)
  • Socioeconomic conditions (e.g., concentrated poverty and the stressful conditions that accompany it)
  • Residential segregation
  • Language/Literacy
  • Access to mass media and emerging technologies (e.g., cell phones, the Internet, and social media)
  • Culture

Examples of physical determinants include:

  • Natural environment, such as green space (e.g., trees and grass) or weather (e.g., climate change)
  • Built environment, such as buildings, sidewalks, bike lanes, and roads
  • Worksites, schools, and recreational settings
  • Housing and community design
  • Exposure to toxic substances and other physical hazards
  • Physical barriers, especially for people with disabilities
  • Aesthetic elements (e.g., good lighting, trees, and benches)

By working to establish policies that positively influence social and economic conditions and those that support changes in individual behavior, we can improve health for large numbers of people in ways that can be sustained over time. Improving the conditions in which we live, learn, work, and play and the quality of our relationships will create a healthier population, society, and workforce.

Healthy People 2020 Approach to Social Determinants of Health

A “place-based” organizing framework, reflecting five (5) key areas of social determinants of health (SDOH), was developed by Healthy People 2020.

These five key areas (determinants) include:

  • Economic Stability
  • Education
  • Social and Community Context
  • Health and Health Care
  • Neighborhood and Built Environment

a diagram of the five social determinants of health

Each of these five determinant areas reflects a number of key issues that make up the underlying factors in the arena of SDOH.

  • Economic Stability
    • Employment
    • Food Insecurity
    • Housing Instability
    • Poverty
  • Education
    • Early Childhood Education and Development
    • Enrollment in Higher Education
    • High School Graduation
    • Language and Literacy
  • Social and Community Context
    • Civic Participation
    • Discrimination
    • Incarceration
    • Social Cohesion
  • Health and Health Care
    • Access to Health Care
    • Access to Primary Care
    • Health Literacy
  • Neighborhood and Built Environment
    • Access to Foods that Support Healthy Eating Patterns
    • Crime and Violence
    • Environmental Conditions
    • Quality of Housing

This organizing framework has been used to establish an initial set of objectives for the topic area as well as to identify existing Healthy People objectives (i.e., in other topic areas) that are complementary and highly relevant to social determinants. It is anticipated that additional objectives will continue to be developed throughout the decade.

 

Thanks For Reading

Marijan Pavisic MS SPHR

 

Hiring Ex-Offenders Is a Positive Move

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As the labor market tightens in our expanding economy, companies will need workers. And people returning to society from prison need jobs. Keeping potential employers and employees apart is fear, lack of understanding, and about 20,000 statutes and regulations across the country that restrict the hiring of ex-offenders.

Businesses and governments want to change that. Yesterday, the White House hosted a roundtable comprising executives from such companies as Uber, Home Depot, and Johns Hopkins Health System, as well as officials like governors John Hickenlooper of Colorado and Matt Bevin of Kentucky, to discuss the challenges and benefits of hiring the group of people now referred to as formerly incarcerated.

Crime has been in decades-long decline, but roughly 70 million adults in this country have criminal records; and more than 10 million return to their communities from incarceration each year. For this group, more jobs equals lower recidivism equals better lives. Yet fresh starts are curtailed by cultural bias, skills deficits, and myriad regulatory barriers. Among the most common: state rules that deny professional licenses to people with criminal histories.

Roundtable participants said they would like to see such rules eased or eliminated. They also want more collaboration between governments and businesses to create pathways from incarceration to employment (primarily for nonviolent offenders). The idea of creating more job-training programs inside prisons was discussed. So was raising the profile of the Department of Labor’s 52-year-old federal bonding program, which guarantees for six months the honesty of hard-to-place job candidates, including people with criminal records.

The smallest business at the table was also the most experienced. For more than 30 years, Greyston Bakery, based in Yonkers, New York, has practiced “open hiring”–filling available positions with anyone who wants them, no questions asked. The $20 million company has employed thousands of ex-offenders. Around 65 percent of the current workforce has been incarcerated.

During the roundtable, Greyston CEO Mike Brady dispelled some of the myths around hiring ex-offenders, whom he called “fully functional and productive members of our team.” Insurance and workers’ comp costs at Greyston are no higher than at comparable businesses, and turnover is actually lower. “Our history is a demonstration that people coming out of the criminal justice system make for an amazing workforce,” said Brady, in a follow-up interview.

Brady urges businesses to be much more inclusive about hiring. Growing competition for talent, he says, “is a great opportunity to look at your human capital plans and make them more welcoming.” The challenge for small companies differs from large ones, however. “We don’t have a large staff of human resources people and lawyers who would raise obstacles to these programs,” he says. “But those resources would also make it easier for us to address risks.”

Policymakers have been making some strides. For example, more than 150 cities and counties have adopted ban-the-box rules preventing employers from asking about criminal history on job applications. But there’s a distinction between making it harder for companies to not hire the formerly incarcerated and persuading them to actively seek out ex-offenders and help them become valued employees. “The governor of Kentucky said we have to keep biting the apple. There is just so much low-hanging fruit,” says Brady. “Progressive businesses have an opportunity to take the lead in giving people a chance. It has got a positive ROI if you do it right.”

Everyone deserves a 2nd chance.

Happy Nurses Week-National Nurses Week History

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National Nurses Week History

National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. These permanent dates enhance planning and position National Nurses Week as an established recognition event. As of 1998, May 8 was designated as National Student Nurses Day, to be celebrated annually. And as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week (May 6-12) each year.

The nursing profession has been supported and promoted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) since 1896. Each of ANA’s state and territorial nurses associations promotes the nursing profession at the state and regional levels. Each conducts celebrations on these dates to recognize the contributions that nurses and nursing make to the community.

The ANA supports and encourages National Nurses Week recognition programs through the state and district nurses associations, other specialty nursing organizations, educational facilities, and independent health care companies and institutions.

A Brief History of National Nurses Week

1953 Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower to proclaim a “Nurse Day” in October of the following year. The proclamation was never made.

1954 National Nurse Week was observed from October 11 – 16. The year of the observance marked the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. Representative Frances P. Bolton sponsored the bill for a nurse week. Apparently, a bill for a National Nurse Week was introduced in the 1955 Congress, but no action was taken. Congress discontinued its practice of joint resolutions for national weeks of various kinds.

1972 Again a resolution was presented by the House of Representatives for the President to proclaim “National Registered Nurse Day.” It did not occur.

1974 In January of that year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) proclaimed that May 12 would be “International Nurse Day.” (May 12 is the birthday of Florence Nightingale.) Since 1965, the ICN has celebrated “International Nurse Day.”

1974 In February of that year, a week was designated by the White House as National Nurse Week, and President Nixon issued a proclamation.

1978 New Jersey Governor Brendon Byrne declared May 6 as “Nurses Day.” Edward Scanlan, of Red Bank, N.J., took up the cause to perpetuate the recognition of nurses in his state. Mr. Scanlan had this date listed in Chase’s Calendar of Annual Events. He promoted the celebration on his own.

1981 ANA, along with various nursing organizations, rallied to support a resolution initiated by nurses in New Mexico, through their Congressman, Manuel Lujan, to have May 6, 1982, established as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 In February, the ANA Board of Directors formally acknowledged May 6, 1982 as “National Nurses Day.” The action affirmed a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating May 6 as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, proclaiming “National Recognition Day for Nurses” to be May 6, 1982.

1990 The ANA Board of Directors expanded the recognition of nurses to a week-long celebration, declaring May 6 – 12, 1991, as National Nurses Week.

1993 The ANA Board of Directors designated May 6 – 12 as permanent dates to observe National Nurses Week in 1994 and in all subsequent years.

1996 The ANA initiated “National RN Recognition Day” on May 6, 1996, to honor the nation’s indispensable registered nurses for their tireless commitment 365 days a year. The ANA encourages its state and territorial nurses associations and other organizations to acknowledge May 6, 1996 as “National RN Recognition Day.”

1997 The ANA Board of Directors, at the request of the National Student Nurses Association, designated May 8 as National Student Nurses Day.

 

CarePlus Foundation Board Appointement

It is my honor to be nominated and appointed as a member of the CarePlus Foundation Board of Trustees.

Care Plus Foundation, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, supports the innovative and life-changing programs and services provided by of Care Plus NJ, Inc. and it’s subsidiaries.

Since their inception in 1998, their mission has been to support programs and services that help provide care and support for individuals affected by mental illness, as well as education and outreach to decrease the stigma of the disease.

CarePlus Foundation comprehensive approach to decreasing the stigma of mental illness includes direct support, advocacy, and community involvement. Given that, all funds raised provide direct client support through medication aide, housing support, services, training, and educational scholarships.

Please support this great organization

Thank You

Marijan Pavisic MS SPHR

You can learn more about this great organization following links below

CAREPLUS NJ

CAREPLUS FOUNDATION